Standards

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Carbon Offset Standards

The QAS runs all applications through a 40 point carbon offset checklist to ensure it meets the highest standards worldwide before approval.

You can find both the 40 point checklist and the fuller ARRP rulebook below.

40 point carbon offset checklist

Download the 40 point carbon offset checklist: 40 point carbon offset checklist (pdf)

Application checks

1. Companies applying with carbon offset products for approval must be registered with a national authority.
2. A board director must sign off the company’s QAS applications and the QAS requirements.
3. Agreement made that carbon offset projects used against QAS-approved offsets must carry one of the following high quality certificates: CERs, ERUs, AAUs, EUAs, Gold Standard VERs or VCS version 2007 onwards.
4. Agreement must be made that no approved offsets will use project methodologies using hydro>20MW.
5. Agreement must be made that no approved offsets will use HFC23 project methodologies.
6. Agreement must be made that approved offsets based on land use employ sustainable REDD+ project methodologies.
7. Agreement must be made that the company is not promoting the purchase of carbon credits for investment purposes.
8. Agreement must be made that offline usage of the Quality Mark must be marked with the dates of approval and a permanent URL which carries a full description of the offset online.

Emissions calculations

9. QAS approved carbon offsets must be calculated from a particular activity over a defined period of time.
10. Emissions calculations must be based on the most recent datasets available.
11. Summary methodology information must be accurate and concise.
12. Emissions calculations must adhere to the hierarchy of emissions calculation methodologies provided in Annex 1 of the QAS ARRP.
13. Where standard emissions methodologies are not applicable, non-standard methodologies must be justified on reasonable grounds and this must be made clear at the point of purchase.
14. A Radiative Forcing Index (RFI) of 1.9 is recommended, any other RFI must be used consistently and transparently.
15. Country-specific emissions must be calculated from an appropriate dataset.
16. Organisation-derived emissions datasets must be appropriately calculated, eg data derived from airline fleets.
17. Uplift of 15% must be applied to car test cycle emission factors to convert to ‘real-world’ emission factor values.
18. Uplift of 8% to be applied to average flight distance or actual Great Circle flight distances to take into account indirect routing and delays.
19. Aviation calculations must take account of class of travel or other loading factors.
20. If the manufacturer standard European test cycle is used for car or van calculations, estimates must be included for emissions of CH4 and N2O from DCF Annex 6 or 7.
21. Average journey distances must comply with the data in Annex 1 of the QAS ARRP.

Website checks

22. All references made to a QAS approved offset must either refer prominently to the activity and period of time against which it is made, or link to a page where that information is displayed prominently.
23. All non-QAS offsets must be clearly separated from QAS offsets.
24. QAS Quality Mark must be used within brand guidelines, including only being used in association with approved offsets and linking to the approvals page on the QAS website.
25. Summary methodology information should be made available at the point of purchase.
26. Any non-standard methodologies must be made clear at the point of purchase.
27. Any RFI other than 1.9 must be made clear at the point of purchase.
28. Websites comply with the DEFRA Green Claims Guidance.
29. The appropriate dataset for any international emissions must be displayed prominently at the point of purchase.
30. The purchase of carbon credits for investment purposes is not advocated.
31. Pricing per tonne should be easily found and made clear whether inclusive or exclusive of tax Total price and price per tonne should be made clear as a minimum at the point of sale and in any case before the consumer is committed to purchasing an offset.
32. General information must be provided on the role of carbon offsetting in tackling climate change and the ethical importance of reducing native carbon footprints (‘internal reduction’) before carbon offsetting (‘external reduction’).
33. Information must be provided on how to reduce the measured carbon footprint; alternatively, clear signposting to a suitable information source should be made available to the consumer or organisation.
34. If social benefits are being claimed for VCS projects without double tagging (Social Carbon & CCBA accreditation), a specific disclaimer must be prominently displayed.
35. CO2 emissions must be clearly differentiated from CO2e.

Renewal checks

36. Statement of account for all QAS-approved offsets sold during the 12 month period of QAS approval must be signed off by a chartered accountant.
37. QAS approved carbon offset projects must carry one of the following high quality certificates: CERs, ERUs, AAUs, EUAs, Gold Standard VERs or VCS version 2007 onwards.
38. All credits sold during the 12 month period of approval must have been cancelled (retired) in an appropriate registry and direct evidence sought from that registry.
39. Carbon credits from contentious methodologies outlined at application must not have been used for QAS-approved offsets during the period of renewal.
40. All QAS approved offsets should undergo renewal 12 months later. If not, a note will be made against that offset on the QAS website.

ARRP

Download the ARRP: QAS ARRP v1.2.1 (pdf)

Table of Contents

1. Introduction

2. The Approval Process

3. Calculating Emissions

4. Project and Credit Criteria

5. Consumer Information

6. The Quality Mark

7. Breaches of QAS Requirements

8. Annex 1: Emission Factors

9. Annex 2: Information & Evidence Required for Application and Renewal

1. Introduction

1.1. This document sets out the approval and renewal requirements and procedures for the Quality Assurance Standard for Carbon Offsetting (QAS). Carbon offsets approved by the QAS can use the QAS Quality Mark so that individual or business consumers can easily recognise the.

1.2. The QAS is a new quality assurance initiative for carbon offsetting run by Quality Assurance Standard Ltd, registered in England no 07798725, a company limited by guarantee and whose articles of association prohibit distribution of its profits to its members. QAS approvals and renewals are independently audited by an Independent Auditor (IA).

1.3. The QAS sets high standards for best practice in carbon offsetting. Approved offsets have to demonstrate the following criteria:

  • accurate calculation of emissions must be offset against a defined activity by the offset provider or reseller;
  • use of high quality carbon credits as defined in section 4 of this document;
  • cancellation of carbon credits used to offset within 3 months of the end of each rolling 12 month period of QAS approval; and
  • provision of clear and prominent information about the role of offsetting in tackling climate change, the importance and methods available to reduce carbon footprints separately from offsetting them, and carbon offset pricing.

1.4. The following do not constitute a carbon offset under the QAS:

  • Purchasing and then cancelling a volume of carbon credits in the absence of accurate calculation of emissions relating to a defined activity; or
  • Selling carbon credits to a third-party that has already calculated the tonnage of emissions it wishes to offset – in essence this is the sale of carbon credits as outlined in the case above.

1.5. Offset providers or resellers may sell both approved offsets and offsets that do not meet the requirements of the QAS, however the former must be clearly distinguished from the latter to avoid any possible confusion.

1.6. Offset providers must grant access to a registry connected to the UNFCCC international transaction log, or the VCS project database as appropriate to allow the IA clear confirmation of the cancellation of the appropriate quantity of credits to comply with the QAS.

1.7. It is recognised that an offset provider may wish to arrange for a third party to fulfil one or more of the above mentioned criteria (for example, carbon credits may be supplied and retired by a broker). Where this is the case it remains the responsibility of the offset provider to demonstrate to the IA that the requirements of the QAS are met.

1.8. A reseller is defined as an organisation that does not sell offsets to the end client as its primary business, and who delegates emission calculations and the sourcing and cancelling of carbon credits to a third party provider able to provide approved offsets. Any offset reseller can seek QAS approval for the offset product that they sell, which would then allow use of the Quality Mark within the bounds of the QAS Mark License Agreement (QMLA). Adherence to calculation methodologies, credit types and cancellation policies are the responsibilities of the responsible QAS approved offset provider.

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2. The Approval Process

2.1. Offset providers and resellers seeking QAS approval for carbon offsets must fill out an application form, provide documentary evidence as detailed in Annex 2 of this document, and pay a fee by bank transfer as detailed in 2.9 below. The application process is open at regular intervals throughout the year.

2.2. A board director of the organisation applying for QAS offset approval must sign the QAS Application Form.

2.3. QAS carbon offset approval lasts 12 months; renewal is required for continued approval beyond 12 months. A ‘Statement of Accounts’ must be drawn up within three months of the end of the period of approval to provide the QAS with an annualised total of QAS-approved carbon offsets sold during the approval period – this must be signed off by a chartered accountant and emailed to the QAS. This total figure will be used by the independent auditor to make sure sufficient credits have been retired. Where renewal does not take place and therefore the independent auditor is not able to check adequate carbon credit retirals, a note will be made against this offset on the QAS website to that effect.

2.4. The IA will start the approval processes for all applications for which cleared funds have been received in the specified bank account within two weeks after applications are closed. Note payment can only be received by BACS or CHAPS bank transfer; cheques or cash are not accepted methods of payment.

2.5. Applications which have not met QAS requirements but only require minor amends, especially a limited number of incorrect emissions factors, will be given feedback and invited to correct the identified deficiencies within the current application process. Applications which require more extensive or time consuming corrections will be provided with detailed feedback and invited to resubmit at the next quarterly application cycle for an additional fee of £1500.

2.6. Fees for withdrawn applications will not be refunded.

2.7. Details of individual applications will not be published but a list of approved offsets, their dates of approval, and their providers or resellers will be detailed on the QAS website.

2.8. Offset providers may supply QAS approved offsets to resellers provided that they provide the necessary information to support that reseller’s application for QAS approval, namely information relating to the sections on calculation methodologies and carbon credits. Providers which do so become the Responsible Provider for that reseller and are then also responsible for ensuring that their resellers comply with the QMLA. Repeated or persistent violations of the terms of the QMLA may lead to withdrawal of QAS offset approval for the reseller and/ or their Responsible Provider.

2.9. Initial & renewal fees for application to have an offset approved by the QAS are stratified based on the higher of either the offset provider’s turnover, or balance sheet total, relating to the highest parent company or organisation. To support a reduced application fee, medium, small and micro providers/ resellers must provide evidence of their turnover and balance sheet total from the management accounts relating to the most recently finished financial year, or if the company has not yet completed its first financial year, year-to-date and projected figures for the current financial year. This evidence must be signed by a chartered accountant.

Organisation

Application fee*

Higher of either Turnover or Balance sheet total

Larger Provider

£10,000

>£8m

Medium Provider

£5,000

£1.6 – 8m

Small Provider

£2,250

£0.3 – £1.6m

Micro Provider

£1,500

£0.3m

Large Reseller

£5,000

>£8m

Medium Reseller

£3,500

£1.6 – 8m

Small Reseller

£2,000

£0.3 – 1.6m

Micro Reseller

£1,500

£0.3m

*Application fee ex VAT

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3. Calculating Emissions

3.1. Offsets will only be approved if they calculate emissions from a particular activity over a defined period of time. All references made of a QAS approved offset must either refer prominently to the activity and period of time against which it is made, or link to a page where that information is displayed prominently.

3.2. The QAS demands accurate calculations but does not require a consumer or organisation to offset the emissions associated with the whole of their business/ lifestyle or for all of a defined activity – it is for the consumer or organisation to decide the scope of emissions that they wish to offset. For example a consumer may decide to offset domestic but not international flights or just one month’s electricity consumption. When offsetting emissions from a particular activity or over a period of time, it is important that the emissions are calculated accurately using a consistent agreed dataset and methodological approach, and that the scope is clearly and prominently displayed whenever an offset is referred to.

3.3. Acceptable methodological approaches include DEFRA’s Voluntary Reporting Guidelines, the WRI Greenhouse Gas Protocol and ISO standards such as ISO14064. The appropriate Global Warming Potential (GWP) factors that can be used to calculate the CO2 equivalent emission for the major non-CO2 greenhouse gases are included in Annex 5 of the Defra/DECC GHG Conversion Factors for Company Reporting. Applicants will be required to use the factors current at the time of application and update their calculators to reflect subsequent changes to the Voluntary Reporting Guidelines and Greenhouse Gas Conversion Factors at each renewal. Further information on the requirements regarding emission factors is provided in Annex 1.

3.4. Where there is more than one method of calculating emissions, the offset provider should use the most accurate figures for each defined activity. For example emissions calculated on the basis £ spent (i.e. Annex 13 of the ‘Guidelines to Defra / DECC’s Greenhouse Gas Conversion Factors for Company Reporting’) should only be used where it is not possible to calculate emissions using information in the other Annexes of the same document. Additional information on the hierarchy of emission calculation methodologies is provided in Annex 1.

3.5. Where no emissions factors are available from standard approved lists, providers may use non-standard methodology provided that every offset so calculated is clearly and prominently labelled as such on the offset provider/ reseller AND client websites, or documentation provided to the client if the transaction is not completed over a website. It is the approved offset providers’ responsibility to ensure that their clients comply with this aspect of the QAS. Repeated or persistent violations of this clause may lead to withdrawal of QAS offset approval for the provider or reseller involved.

3.6. Offset providers/ resellers must provide clear summary information on all standard methodological approaches taken to calculate emissions with their application form and on their website.

3.7. There is no different factor for electricity purchased on a renewable energy tariff. This is because electricity suppliers already have a legal obligation to supply a certain amount of electricity from renewable sources – contributing to the UK grid average factor – and existing evidence suggests that we cannot quantify any additional carbon savings from renewable energy tariffs. This would also cover the purchase of electricity from low carbon sources such as CHP.

3.8. Unlike most other sectors the large majority of non-CO2 effects of aviation are not major greenhouse gases. These effects include soot, contrails, water vapour, NOx etc. The science evidence base on these effects continues to develop. However, there has been a body of research suggesting that, despite remaining uncertainties, these non-CO2 effects are significant.

3.9. To account indicatively for the total radiative forcing impacts of aviation, it is recommended that a factor, or multiplier, should be used to up-rate carbon dioxide emissions. In line with best scientific evidence, and to ensure consistency, the QAS recommends a figure of 1.9 for flight offsets. Where offset providers choose NOT to adopt this recommendation, it should be made clear to consumers that this position has been taken at the point of purchase. Further information is provided in Annex 1.

3.10. The QAS wishes to see full transparency in the way that emissions from flights are calculated in terms of the distance travelled and any uplift factors applied to account for circling and delay. It is acknowledged that a number of methods are currently used. The relevant factors in Annex 1 should be used if distance travelled and any uplift factors applied to account for circling and delay are used in flight emissions calculations.

3.11. Non-UK operations use energy sources or equipment with potentially significantly different GHG emissions performance. In such cases it is appropriate to allow flexibility for the use of equivalent robust local emission factor datasets where available as alternatives to the UK focused default – i.e. Defra/DECC GHG Conversion Factors for Company Reporting.

3.12. Acceptable alternatives to the default emission factors in such cases include (up to date) official emission factors from national governments (or their agencies), or emission factors utilised by the GHG Protocol (http://www.ghgprotocol.org). For example, for activities occurring within the US, emissions factors from the US EPA may be used; or for activities within New Zealand, emissions factors published by New Zealand’s Ministry for the Environment may be used, etc.

3.13. As part of the approval process the offset provider must confirm/highlight to the IA where they intend to use emission factors other than the defaults (or any validated specific emission factors, see below) for activities outside the UK and provide information on their basis and source. It is the responsibility of the applicant to ensure that the chosen factors stand up to orthodox scrutiny. This provision excludes flights and shipping to/from the UK, for which the default factors (i.e. from Defra/DECC GHG Conversion Factors for Company Reporting) should be used , unless more accurate fleet-specific data is available (e.g. where an airline offsets their own fleet of planes).

3.14. In some cases it may also be appropriate to allow alternate methodologies and emission factors. For example in some overseas (non-UK) territories fuel/energy consumption data (e.g. gas or electricity use for office buildings) may not be typically available/obtainable in units of energy (or volume or mass), unlike in Europe or the US. In such cases, alternate metrics (such as office floor area) might be used to estimate GHG emissions instead. Such methodologies and accompanying emission factors would need to be described during application and subsequent renewal with the IA and clearly and prominently displayed next to any use of the Quality Mark used in connection with offsets based on such calculations.

3.15. If an offset provider is selling an offset with other services it may be appropriate to allow the use emissions factors specific to that service. For example, if an airline sells offsets for their own fleet of planes they may have more accurate fleet-specific data. If an offset provider wishes to use a specific set of emissions factors they must request this in their application and declare this fact clearly and prominently next to all uses of the Quality Mark.

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4. Project and Credit Criteria

4.1. Approved offsets must use good quality carbon credits, defined for the purpose of the QAS as: CERs, ERUs, AAUs, EUAs, Gold Standard VERs or VCS version 2007 forwards which do not arise from projects which:

  • use hydro > 20MW project methodologies;
  • use HFC23 project methodologies;
  • are forestry-related unless based on sustainable REDD+ project methodologies

4.2. Carbon credits used to fulfil a consumer’s purchase for an approved offset must be cancelled by an appropriate registry by the end of each rolling 12 month period of QAS approval and access to the registry provided to the IA at each renewal to confirm this.

4.3. Were there to be a delay in forwarding credits to the appropriate registries for any reason outside of the control of offset providers, providers would be asked to provide to the IA evidence of either:

  • sufficient forward contracts for credits to cover offsets sold;
  • evidence that they have cancelled a sufficient quantity of credits on a registry connected to the UNFCCC international transaction log or the VCS project database or the Gold Standard Registry as appropriate.

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5. Consumer Information

5.1. Offset providers and resellers must make clear and truthful any marketing and advertising associated with QAS approved offsets in line with the latest DEFRA Green Claims Guidance. This includes ensuring that any reference to an offset contains clearly and prominently displayed information as required by the QAS, for example a summary of the emissions calculation methodology and descriptions of any non-standard calculation methodology as already outlined specifically in section 3.

5.2. If social benefits are being claimed for VCS projects without double tagging (Social Carbon & CCBA accreditation) then a specific prominent disclaimer must be added to all references made to that offset to the effect that the social benefits have not been verified and are not accredited by the QAS, including the main offset description, wherever the Quality Mark is displayed.

5.3. Offset providers and resellers must provide general information on the role of carbon offsetting in tackling climate change and the ethical importance of reducing native carbon footprints (‘internal reduction’) before carbon offsetting (‘external reduction’).

5.4. Offset providers must also provide information on how to reduce the measured carbon footprint; alternatively, clear signposting to a suitable information source should be made available to the consumer or organisation.

5.5. Offset providers and resellers must make available the total price and price per tonne purchased by the end consumer as a minimum at the point of sale and before the consumer is committed to purchasing an offset. It should also be clear to the consumer if VAT is included or excluded.

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6. The Quality Mark

6.1. Only QAS approved offsets may be associated with the Quality Mark, and any use of the Quality Mark must follow the terms and conditions in the QAS Quality Mark Licence Agreement.

6.2. An offset provider will clearly distinguish QAS approved offsets from any offsets it may sell that are not QAS approved.

6.3. The use of the Quality Mark is not restricted to online media, however, where it is used in offline media, it must be accompanied by the dates of approval and a permanent URL linking to a full description of the offset online. In order to ensure consumers can check the validity of approval claims, each accredited provider and reseller must link each online use of the Quality Mark to the page on qasoffsetting.com listing approved offsets.

6.4. Non-authorised use of the Quality Mark, and repeated or persistent violation of the QAS QMLA, may lead to the details being published on the QAS website. In the event of continuing misuse, legal proceedings may be initiated.

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7. Breaches of QAS Requirements

7.1. Where an approved offset no longer meets the criteria that led to its approval or it is discovered that approval was gained through false or misleading statements, QAS approval will be suspended and the provider and/or reseller will be required to remove all references to QAS approval online.

7.2. The QAS Quality Mark Licence Agreement sets out the requirements with which a QAS approved offset must continue to comply. Where an approved offset fails to comply with any of the requirements of the QAS, the offset provider and/or reseller will be informed and offered the chance to correct the error within 10 working days.

7.3. In the event that no or insufficient corrective action is taken the right to use the Quality Mark will be withdrawn. A breach of the Licence Agreement will be considered a breach of contract and the offset provider may be taken to court.

7.4. Where an offset provider or reseller would like to make changes to an approved offset they should inform the QAS before they are made. QAS will then assess the change and determine if the offset still meets the requirements of the QAS or if a new application for the offset should be submitted. For example, if the offset provider’s website is completely redesigned the QAS may need to check that the Quality Mark is still being used correctly and that the right consumer information is provided in the right place.

7.5. Any organisation or individual that has information on any suspected breaches of QAS requirements should pass this information to the QAS. Organisations deemed to be in breach of QAS requirements but persisting in using the Quality Mark as well as any organisations using the Quality Mark without having applied for approval may also be named publicly on the QAS website.

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8. Annex 1: Emission Factors

Background

Offset providers calculate emissions using data from different sources. Most providers use a carbon calculator, where a distance travelled or energy bill is inputted and a value for the associated emissions is calculated.

Standard factors acceptable under the QAS are available in the ‘Guidelines to Defra / DECC’s Greenhouse Gases Conversion Factors for Company Reporting’:
http://www.defra.gov.uk/environment/economy/business-efficiency/reporting/

These factors are usually updated annually and the latest factors should be used. It is recognised that it may take some time for offset providers to update their conversion factors to the latest factors once they become available, but this should ordinarily be done within three months of publication.

Scope

The footnotes and explanations in the ‘Guidelines to Defra / DECC’s Greenhouse Gases Conversion Factors for Company Reporting’ should be read carefully so that the factors are used accurately and are not misrepresented to consumers. For example, where emissions from fuel or transport activity are calculated, it should be clear whether this cover only emissions directly resulting from the use of fuel or also include indirect emissions resulting from the fuel’s production and distribution, etc. It must also be clear whether they are providing calculations based upon CO2 emissions only, or total emissions of CO2, CH4 and N2O (in CO2e).

Specific Note on Calculating Emissions from Transport

The following methods of calculation of CO2 equivalent emissions from transport are recommended in order of their accuracy:

1. It is recommended that where possible CO2e emissions are calculated from the actual quantities of fuel used (i.e. in litres, tonnes, or energy units) using the factors in Annex 1 of the ‘Guidelines to Defra / DECC’s Greenhouse Gases Conversion Factors for Company Reporting’ (DCF).

2. In the absence of data on actual quantities of fuel, this may be estimated from the observed average fuel consumption of the vehicle (e.g. in miles per gallon or similar units) and the distance travelled (in miles or km) and again using the emission factors in DCF Annex 1.

3. In the observed fuel consumption is not available, manufacturer data on CO2 emissions per km may be available for cars or vans – based on the standard European test cycle. These factors must be uplifted by 15% to take into account ‘real-world’ driving conditions. To include estimates of emissions of CH4 and N2O the appropriate emission factors by engine size or market segment from DCF Annex 6 or 7 should be used.

4. In the absence of manufacturer data on the CO2 emission factors, the average emission factors provided in DCF Annex 6 or 7 should be used. It is recommended that the highest level of detail is used where possible, for example the specific vehicle type, engine size, weight category and % loading as appropriate. This will be more accurate than using the simple overall averages for a particular mode or fuel type. For cars, the emission factors by size category are preferred over the alternative of market segmentation based factors.

5. If the actual distance travelled is unavailable, UK average values are provided for cars, motorcycles and flights below. For air transport, in line with current best scientific evidence, the QAS recommends that a radiative forcing factor of 1.9 should be used but it is up to offset providers to decide whether or not to include this with flights. If used, this factor would be applied to the emissions factors set out in DCF Annexes 6 and 7. To ensure consistency alternative factors should not be used.

Average passenger transport activity and other factors

  • Car UK average annual distance – 14,484Km/ 9000 Miles
  • Uplift to be applied to car test cycle emission factors to convert to ‘real-world’ emission factor
    values – 15% (see note 1. below)
  • Motorcycle UK average annual distance 5,955 Km/ 3700 Miles
  • Flight domestic average flight length 425Km (see note 2. below)
  • Flight short-haul average flight length 1,200Km (see note 2. below)
  • Flight long-haul Average flight length 7,000Km (see note 2. below)
  • Uplift to be applied to average flight distance or actual Great Circle flight distances to take
    into account indirect routing/delays : 9%
  • Flight Recommended Radiative Forcing factor to be used for aviation: 1.9

Notes:

1. Real world effects not covered in regular test cycles include use of accessories (air con, lights, heaters, etc), vehicle payload (only driver +25kg is considered in tests, no passengers or further luggage), poor maintenance (tyre under inflation, maladjusted tracking, etc), gradients (tests effectively assume a level road), weather, harsher driving style, etc. Whilst these factors might be applicable to individual cars, they will differ to those from dividing the total carbon emitted from all cars (total car fuel sales) by total car kilometres driven; that is, the emission factor for the average car kilometre driven. This is because lower CO2 emitting cars, for example, newer cars and diesel cars, are on average driven more than higher CO2 emitting cars such as older cars and sports cars. Thus, a use or traffic weighted average car emission factor will be significantly lower than these factors published here and hence these factors do not correlate to national emissions.

2. Only to be used in the absence of specific Great Circle Distances for flights between origin and destination airports.

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9. Annex 2: Evidence Required for Application and Renewal

9.1. Information required to complete the initial application for offset providers and resellers includes:

  • Full name of organisation, status (i.e. ltd, plc), registration address and number at Companies House or national equivalent, country of registration, VAT no and trading names in use;
  • Primary contact name, telephone number and e-mail address;
  • Director contact name,
    telephone number and e-mail address (if Primary contact is not a
    Director of the organisation);
  • Web page URLs for all calculations relating to candidate QAS offsets (inc downloadable spreadsheets)
  • Web page URLs describing methodologies for calculation of candidate QAS offsets
  • Web page URLs where non-QAS offsets will be sold by the same organisation
  • The turnover and balance sheet total relating to the highest parent company or organisation, from management accounts relating to the most recently finished financial year, or if the organisation has not yet completed its first financial year, year-to-date and projected figures for the current financial year. This evidence must be signed by a chartered accountant (for resellers – this must be for their own organisation rather than their Responsible Provider).

9.2. Renewals must additionally include the following evidence:

A statement of account for all QAS approved offsets sold during the 12 month period of QAS approval, which has been checked and signed by a chartered accountant. The Statement of Account should include:

  • The total volume of credits sold through approved offsets during the approval period, including those sold direct to the end-consumer or via resellers (preferred evidence should be provided by an appropriate independent third party, such as an accountant or verifier, confirming that the volume of approved offsets sold in the preceding 12 month approval period is correct).
  • The date of cancellation and CITL / ITL/ VCS project database identification numbers for all credits cancelled or date transferred to the credit account in the preceding 12 month approval period.

Note – Where supporting registry transaction detail is not in the public domain and accessible online, all providers must give written consent for the IA to verify relevant transaction and/or organise 3rd party access to the relevant registries for the same purpose.

This version (v1.2) of the ARRP came into force on 18th July 2013.

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